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Shocking! Gulab Jamun is not from India; 10 famous desi foods that are not of Indian origin

2023-11-30 03:09:53source:zop

One of the most fulfilling feelings in the world is eating traditional food from our nation. It keeps you authentically connected to your roots and history. Indian cuisine is one such cuisine that is so diversified that it is difficult to realise that everything we eat today started here.

Shocking! Gulab Jamun is not from India; 10 famous desi foods that are not of Indian origin

While India has a rich culinary heritage of its own, it has also embraced and adapted various dishes from other cultures over time.

Shocking! Gulab Jamun is not from India; 10 famous desi foods that are not of Indian origin

Here are ten famous desi foods commonly found in India that are not originally of Indian origin:

Shocking! Gulab Jamun is not from India; 10 famous desi foods that are not of Indian origin

Biryani: Biryani is a popular rice dish made with aromatic spices, meat (such as chicken, mutton, or fish), and basmati rice. It is believed to have originated in Persia (modern-day Iran) and was introduced to India by the Mughals.

Samosa:Samosas are deep-fried or baked pastry pockets filled with savory ingredients like spiced potatoes, peas, and sometimes meat. They have roots in Central Asia and were introduced to the Indian subcontinent by traders from the Middle East.

Jalebi:Jalebi is a sweet dessert made by deep-frying a wheat flour batter into pretzel or spiral shapes and then soaking them in sugar syrup. It is thought to have originated in the Middle East and was brought to India by Persian invaders.

Gulab Jamun:Gulab Jamun is a popular sweet made from deep-fried dough balls soaked in a sugary syrup flavored with cardamom and rose water. Its origins can be traced back to the Persian dessert called "luqmat al-qadi."

Pav Bhaji:Pav Bhaji is a popular street food dish consisting of a spicy vegetable curry (bhaji) served with buttery bread rolls (pav). It originated in the state of Maharashtra, India, as a quick lunch option for textile mill workers but has Portuguese influences.

Vindaloo:Vindaloo is a spicy curry dish typically made with meat (usually pork or chicken) marinated in a mixture of vinegar, garlic, ginger, and spices. Its roots lie in the Portuguese dish called "Carne de Vinha d'Alhos," introduced to Goa, India, by Portuguese colonizers.

Dhokla: Dhokla is a savory snack made from fermented chickpea or rice flour, often tempered with mustard seeds, curry leaves, and served with chutney. It originated in the state of Gujarat, India, but has influences from the Persian dish called "dokhla."

Falooda: Falooda is a dessert beverage made with sweetened milk, vermicelli noodles, basil seeds, rose syrup, and sometimes ice cream. It is believed to have originated in Persia and was brought to India during the Mughal era.

Kebabs:Kebabs are a variety of grilled or skewered meat dishes. While India has its own versions of kebabs, the concept of marinating and grilling meat on skewers can be traced back to the Middle East and Central Asia.

Chai:Chai, or spiced tea, is an integral part of Indian culture. However, tea itself was introduced to India by the British during the colonial period. Indians adopted and adapted it, adding their own twist by brewing it with spices like cardamom, cinnamon, ginger, and cloves.

Read more: From Lucknowi, Kolkata to Hyderabadi, know all about the journey of biryani in India